Friday, 05 August 2016 09:54

Beatle Bob's Top St. Louis Swinging Shindig Show Of The Weekend: Happy Together Tour 2016 - Saturday, August 6 -Family Arena.

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It's one of the biggest sixties teen hit parade fare and worship worthy rock roll package tours to make the St. Louis scene. The Happy Together roars forth with an astonishing barrage of foot stompin', brain sprainin' teentown tantrums! All presented for your drooling pleasure on this deluxe package tour. Here's The All-Star lineup:

The Turtles were one of the more enjoyable American pop groups of the '60s, moving from folk-rock inspired by the Byrds to a sparkling fusion of Zombies-inspired chamber pop and straight-ahead, good-time pop reminiscent of the Lovin' Spoonful, the whole infused with the beautiful sunshine pop vocal harmonies courtesy of dual frontmen Howard Kaylan and Mark Volman. "Happy Together" spent three weeks at number one on the American charts, and proved to be one of the biggest hits of the year. The Turtles' next three singles were written by Bonner-Gordon and each hit the Top 20: the number three hit "She'd Rather Be with Me" (which eclipsed even "Happy Together" in terms of international success), plus "You Know What I Mean" and "She's My Girl." Kaylan and Volman later joined Frank Zappa's Mothers of Invention during the early '70s and also recorded themselves as Flo & Eddie.

One of the most popular and entertaining rock groups of the 1960s, Paul Revere & the Raiders enjoyed seven years of serious chart action, and during their three biggest years (1966-1969) sold records in numbers behind only the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. The band members had gone through a visual metamorphosis, adding Revolutionary War-style outfits to their look and they stood out for playing straight-ahead rock & roll and having fun doing it.  Their hits -- "Steppin' Out," "Just Like Me," "Hungry," "Him or Me," and "Kicks" in particular -- are now seen by compilers as bold, unpretentious pieces of '60s rock & roll with a defiant, punk edge  -- like cool (yet frustrated) suburban white teenagers, which was the audience they were aiming for. The Raiders lead singer Mark Lindsay sounded the way every male teen 14 through 17 pictured himself looking and acting at the age of 21, free and ready to say what he felt like and make it stick.

Three Dog Night scored a succession of 21 hit singles, including eleven Top Tens and twelve consecutive gold albums from 1969 to 1975, thanks to the slick, sometimes soulful vocal harmonies of singers Danny Hutton, Chuck Negron, and Cory Wells and an excellent ear for quality material. The band was noted for its creative arrangements and interpretations and their cover choices gave exposure (and royalties) to several talented songwriters: Nilsson ("One"), Laura Nyro ("Eli's Coming"), Randy Newman ("Mama Told Me (Not to Come)"), Hoyt Axton ("Joy to the World"), Argent's Russ Ballard ("Liar"), and Leo Sayer ("The Show Must Go On"). Cory Wells passed away in October 2015 so it will be only Chuck Negron as the Lone Dog Night on the Happy Together Tour.

The real-life inspiration behind the hit television series The Partridge Family, the Cowsills -- comprised of teen siblings Bill, Bob, Barry, John, Susan, and Paul in tandem with mother Barbara -- were one of the biggest pop acts of the late '60s, scoring a series of hits including "The Rain, the Park and Other Things" and "Hair" with their angelic harmonies and sun-kissed melodies. The Cowsills started during the golden age of pop record-making and they were one of the more gifted and ambitious groups to hit the charts in their day. Currently, Bob, Paul and Susan perform several shows per month as The Cowsills while still maintaining their separate lives and careers.

His ferocious soul-drenched vocals belying his tender teenage years, Stevie Winwood powered the Spencer Davis Group's three biggest U.S. hits during their brief life span as one of the British Invasion's most convincing R&B-based combos. Guitarist Davis formed the band with Winwood on organ, his brother Muff Winwood on bass, and drummer Peter York. The group's two hottest sellers were self-penned projects. "Gimme Some Lovin'" and "I'm a Man" were searing showcases for the adolescent Winwood's gritty vocals and blazing keyboards and the band's pounding rhythms. Although they burned up the charts even on the other side of the ocean in 1967, the quartet never capitalized on their fame with an American tour. At the height of their power, Winwood left to form Traffic, leaving Davis without his dynamic frontman. It will be Spencer Davis performing at the Family Arena sans Steve Winwood.

During the late '60s -- a period forever distinguished as rock's most radical, innovative, and far-reaching -- Gary Puckett and the Union Gap forged a series of massive chart ballads almost otherworldly in their sheer earnestness and melodrama. Likely the only pop band of the era to play two nightly shows in the Catskills -- the early gig for their younger fans, the later appearance for the fans' parents -- the group pioneered the hip-to-be-square concept two decades before spiritual descendants Huey Lewis and the News; clad in Civil War-era get-ups (complete with fictitious military ranks), Puckett and the Union Gap were in their own way as far-out and singular as any other act of the period.

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